Dominos Pizza Surveillance is so Honest and Real

On any given day, I am some gooey mix of hungry and paranoid. This is why I investigate things like Dominos' privacy policy when I'm ordering shitty pizza (come at me, haters). As it turns out, Dominos' privacy policy is one of the most concise and accessible explanations of advertising surveillance I've ever seen. Everything you want to know about cookies, javascript, device tracking, personal information disclosures, and so much more is right. here.

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Dominos does not mince words: only veggies. They tell you exactly what they track.
"When you visit the Web Sites or Applications (including when you use the Applications in a Domino’s Pizza store), certain “usage information” about your visit is automatically collected, which may include device identifier, information about the type of device, operating system and browser you use, the server name and IP address through which you access the internet (which identifies the company providing you internet access and general geographic information), the MAC address of the your device, the date and time you access the site, the pages you access while at the Web Sites or Applications, and the internet address of the web sites, if any, from which you linked directly to the Web Sites or Applications."

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Dominos adheres to the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework to comply with both European and U.S. requirements for data involved in commerce. My guess is that thanks to the EU's more user-friendly privacy laws, Dominos is forced to abide by them in order to sell pizzas to hungry hungry Euros. This means having to have a clear privacy policy of how they collect your data and what they can do with it.

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What's unusual is how clear and accessible their explanations of surveillance technology are. Consider their explanation of Web Beacons:
Web beacons are small graphic images, also known as "internet tags" or "clear gifs," embedded in web pages and email messages. Web beacons may be used to count the number of visitors to the Web Sites and Applications, to monitor how users navigate the Web Sites and Applications, and to count content views.

The same friendly surveillance tone is employed with Device Fingerprinting:
Device fingerprinting is the process of analyzing and combining sets of information elements from your device’s browser, such as JavaScript objects and installed fonts, in order to create a “fingerprint” of your device and uniquely identify your device and applications.

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The Electronic Frontier Foundation couldn't have said it better themselves!

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Of course, we here at HACK*BLOSSOM absolutely condemn the extent of this user surveillance, even if Dominos is super nice about it. Having to wonder how your pizza shop is tracking your activity across the web is absurd and should not be an issue that exists. We strongly encourage you to install privacy extensions to fight this invasive monitoring.

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The real radical value of this privacy policy is what it means for privacy and data rights. There is an existing regulatory framework, EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework that mandates this unusual level of transparency. What if this framework were not voluntary? What if all commerce websites had to have similar policies, by law? How could lawyers, activists, and technologists fight for stronger data restrictions within the context of Privacy Shield to prevent predatory strategies like ad-tracking or selling user data to 3rd parties in case of bankruptcy?

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Next time you buy a pizza, think about how you're paying beyond just your money. We deserve a future where we can be hungry and lazy with all our personal freedoms in tact.